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The Leadership Institute tours the working farm at Paul Quinn College.

The Leadership Institute classes of 2017 and 2018 recently traded the classroom setting for an outdoor lesson on organic farming and determination. Nearly 40 students made the trip to Paul Quinn College on Tuesday, February 16 to tour the college’s “We Over Me Farm” and learn more about their work programs. This is the second time Parish students have visited this year as part of our School’s ongoing partnership with the historically black college in Dallas. In August, Director of Diversity and Inclusion Tyneeta Canonge and her Student Diversity Leadership Council held a daylong planning retreat at Paul Quinn. Last year, Paul Quinn’s President, Michael Sorrell, spoke to Parish Upper School students and Paul Quinn students traveled to Parish to attend the Academy of Global Studies Distinguished Speaker Series events. The relationship benefits both institutions.

“We believe our students will be people of impact, both locally and globally,” said Dave Monaco, Allen Meyer Head of School. “For those who lead and serve in Dallas, they need to understand that a very different Dallas exists across the Trinity River, one which requires creative thinking and bold action if we are to be a truly vibrant city; in part, that is why we want our students to see what is happening at Paul Quinn College.”

Since coming to Paul Quinn College in 2008, President Sorrell  - recognized by Washington Monthly as one of America’s most innovative college presidents – has taken bold steps to revitalize an institution which was teetering on the brink of dissolution. Some 100 students were enrolled when President Sorrell arrived at Paul Quinn. Today, enrollment has soared past 400 and the college has positioned itself nationally as an innovator. 

“We want our students at Parish, and particularly in the Institute, to lead boldly. There is no better way to understand what this means than to see it firsthand,” Monaco said. “Paul Quinn exemplifies how courageous and creative thinking in the face of constraints can lead to magical innovation.”

That “can do” attitude turned the college’s former football field into an opportunity. President Sorrell disbanded the football team on his second day in office and transitioned the field into a business they now refer to as a “We Over Me Farm." Produce from the farm is sold to area food service companies, including one that services AT&T Stadium. The College also distributes food to churches in the surrounding Highland Hills neighborhood, designated by the federal government as a food desert where people do not have easy access to affordable and nutritious food.

"What stuck out to me the most was just the extreme difference in lifestyle," stated Brittany Burnecke, Class of 2017. "The community is lacking grocery stores, clothing stores and fresh produce which are in abundance in other areas of Dallas. I was impressed by the work Paul Quinn is doing to improve their community," she added. "It taught me that a small organization really can have a large impact."

"One of the things we try to expose our Leadership Institute students to is the importance of recognizing opportunities and applying entrepreneurial thinking to come up with solutions," said Linda Bernard, Upper School Dean of Student Life & Leadership. "What Sorrell and his staff have done at Paul Quinn College is an amazing example of that."

"I learned that in order to have major impact, a leader has to think big and take risks in trying something that has never been done before," noted Katie Mayfield, Class of 2018. 

In addition to touring the farm, Parish students heard how Paul Quinn has transformed itself into a work college, one of only eight in the country and the only Historically Black College designated as such. As a work college, Paul Quinn has been able to lower its tuition cost to $14,000 by giving each student a 150 hour work experience. Freshman and sophomores work campus jobs, including the farm, while juniors and seniors transition to work experiences with corporate partners throughout Dallas. The programs serve as an important lesson for Parish students.

“I thought the work college aspect was super cool,” said Amanda D’Auria, Class of 2017. “Through this, students not only get a great education with limited student loans, but they also graduate with four years of work experience.”

"We met with many student leaders who were heavily involved with the school," said Mayfield. "It was clear that their level of involvement increased their passion and engagement to the school."

That's the same goal for Leadership Institute students as they prepare to launch their own ParishLeads projects during their junior and senior years. The opportunity to see an idea taken from conception to implementation has been invaluable for Parish students.

“I would like to incorporate a visit to Paul Quinn for my LEAD Project,” explained D’Auria who works with the non-profit community outreach group Behind Every Door. She hopes to incorporate a college and life skills program for recipients that want to learn more about opportunities after high school. “I have a bunch of kids that I think would be inspired by Paul Quinn College. It would be a super positive, life-changing experience for them.”

"Through hearing about President Sorrell's process to complete this innovative project, I realized that the leadership models that are taught in class are what make a difference in the real world," added Mayfield. "Therefore, I will try to follow those models in a project since I know that they work."

Parish Reading Buddies at Cigarroa Elementary

Each month a 6th grade advisory travels to Cigarroa elementary where they are paired with a 3rd grader to help them with reading comprehension. Toward the end of the day, the 3rd graders then help our students with their Spanish. To lead, you sometimes have to follow!

    • WedMay17 7th Grade Public Speaking Night 6:00 PM to 7:00 PMGodwin Chapel
The Leadership Institute tours the working farm at Paul Quinn College.

The Leadership Institute classes of 2017 and 2018 recently traded the classroom setting for an outdoor lesson on organic farming and determination. Nearly 40 students made the trip to Paul Quinn College on Tuesday, February 16 to tour the college’s “We Over Me Farm” and learn more about their work programs. This is the second time Parish students have visited this year as part of our School’s ongoing partnership with the historically black college in Dallas. In August, Director of Diversity and Inclusion Tyneeta Canonge and her Student Diversity Leadership Council held a daylong planning retreat at Paul Quinn. Last year, Paul Quinn’s President, Michael Sorrell, spoke to Parish Upper School students and Paul Quinn students traveled to Parish to attend the Academy of Global Studies Distinguished Speaker Series events. The relationship benefits both institutions.

“We believe our students will be people of impact, both locally and globally,” said Dave Monaco, Allen Meyer Head of School. “For those who lead and serve in Dallas, they need to understand that a very different Dallas exists across the Trinity River, one which requires creative thinking and bold action if we are to be a truly vibrant city; in part, that is why we want our students to see what is happening at Paul Quinn College.”

Since coming to Paul Quinn College in 2008, President Sorrell  - recognized by Washington Monthly as one of America’s most innovative college presidents – has taken bold steps to revitalize an institution which was teetering on the brink of dissolution. Some 100 students were enrolled when President Sorrell arrived at Paul Quinn. Today, enrollment has soared past 400 and the college has positioned itself nationally as an innovator. 

“We want our students at Parish, and particularly in the Institute, to lead boldly. There is no better way to understand what this means than to see it firsthand,” Monaco said. “Paul Quinn exemplifies how courageous and creative thinking in the face of constraints can lead to magical innovation.”

That “can do” attitude turned the college’s former football field into an opportunity. President Sorrell disbanded the football team on his second day in office and transitioned the field into a business they now refer to as a “We Over Me Farm." Produce from the farm is sold to area food service companies, including one that services AT&T Stadium. The College also distributes food to churches in the surrounding Highland Hills neighborhood, designated by the federal government as a food desert where people do not have easy access to affordable and nutritious food.

"What stuck out to me the most was just the extreme difference in lifestyle," stated Brittany Burnecke, Class of 2017. "The community is lacking grocery stores, clothing stores and fresh produce which are in abundance in other areas of Dallas. I was impressed by the work Paul Quinn is doing to improve their community," she added. "It taught me that a small organization really can have a large impact."

"One of the things we try to expose our Leadership Institute students to is the importance of recognizing opportunities and applying entrepreneurial thinking to come up with solutions," said Linda Bernard, Upper School Dean of Student Life & Leadership. "What Sorrell and his staff have done at Paul Quinn College is an amazing example of that."

"I learned that in order to have major impact, a leader has to think big and take risks in trying something that has never been done before," noted Katie Mayfield, Class of 2018. 

In addition to touring the farm, Parish students heard how Paul Quinn has transformed itself into a work college, one of only eight in the country and the only Historically Black College designated as such. As a work college, Paul Quinn has been able to lower its tuition cost to $14,000 by giving each student a 150 hour work experience. Freshman and sophomores work campus jobs, including the farm, while juniors and seniors transition to work experiences with corporate partners throughout Dallas. The programs serve as an important lesson for Parish students.

“I thought the work college aspect was super cool,” said Amanda D’Auria, Class of 2017. “Through this, students not only get a great education with limited student loans, but they also graduate with four years of work experience.”

"We met with many student leaders who were heavily involved with the school," said Mayfield. "It was clear that their level of involvement increased their passion and engagement to the school."

That's the same goal for Leadership Institute students as they prepare to launch their own ParishLeads projects during their junior and senior years. The opportunity to see an idea taken from conception to implementation has been invaluable for Parish students.

“I would like to incorporate a visit to Paul Quinn for my LEAD Project,” explained D’Auria who works with the non-profit community outreach group Behind Every Door. She hopes to incorporate a college and life skills program for recipients that want to learn more about opportunities after high school. “I have a bunch of kids that I think would be inspired by Paul Quinn College. It would be a super positive, life-changing experience for them.”

"Through hearing about President Sorrell's process to complete this innovative project, I realized that the leadership models that are taught in class are what make a difference in the real world," added Mayfield. "Therefore, I will try to follow those models in a project since I know that they work."

A Parish family goes above and beyond to help our community.

Described as consummate volunteers, Parish parents Melody and Dan Collins have always been generous in donating their time and skills to the cause of promoting our school. 

“They have tirelessly undertaken a myriad of volunteer opportunities including Parent Association president, Parish Fund chairs (twice!), and serving on the Board of Trustees’ Advancement Committee,” noted Diana Sobey, Advancement Services Coordinator at Parish.

This is a couple that knows a thing or two about going the extra mile. Melody’s unassuming beginnings as a field trip mom and class parent showed her the positive impact her time had on the School. From there she began serving in the library and cafeteria and on various committees within the Parents' Association. The rest, as they say, is history. 

For his part, Dan generously volunteers as a mentor in the Parish Leadership Institute, a program of ParishLeads. Dan helps his mentee, Maxwell Zucker ’16, gain real-world leadership experience. 

“I chose Mr. Collins because … he was insightful and purposeful in his thoughts,” said Zucker.

Dan has always been available to Zucker, whether it’s for a face-to-face conference, a phone call, or even an email session. His real-world business experience is invaluable and allows him to provide a big picture perspective. 

“I was reminded during this [mentor] process… that service can at times be more about being present and available than it is about doing something specific,” commented Dan.

What motivates this benevolent duo? Melody points out they feel strongly about the relevance of service in today’s world, and would like to show their daughter, Frances ’21, that generosity is never wasted. 

“This is our family’s tenth year at Parish … we volunteer to give back to the School that has given so much to our family,” said Melody.

If the Collins’ prove one thing, it’s that everyone has a role to play in promoting Parish. They remind us all that a wide variety of service possibilities await anyone willing to donate time; no matter their interests or schedule, opportunities are available.

True Colors Presentation

Sophomores collaborate on a project that explores different leadership personalities: "Working with a Yellow Personality"

 

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